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Valuing the Global Mortality Consequences of Climate Change Accounting for Adaptation Costs and Benefits

Tamma Carleton, Amir Jina, Michael Delgado, Michael Greenstone, Trevor Houser, Solomon Hsiang, Andrew Hultgren, Robert E Kopp, Kelly E McCusker, Ishan Nath, James Rising, Ashwin Rode, Hee Kwon Seo, Arvid Viaene, Jiacan Yuan, Alice Tianbo Zhang, Valuing the Global Mortality Consequences of Climate Change Accounting for Adaptation Costs and Benefits, The Quarterly Journal of Economics, 2022;, qjac020, https://doi.org/10.1093/qje/qjac020

This paper estimates that the release of an additional ton of carbon dioxide today will cause mean damages to global mortality risk valued at $36.6 under a high emissions scenario and $17.1 under a moderate scenario, using a 2% discount rate that is justified by US Treasury rates over the last two decades. It is a core input to the Climate Impact Lab's Data-driven Spatial Climate Impact Model (DSCIM).

Published April 21, 2022

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DSCIM-Coastal v1.0: An Open-Source Modeling Platform for Global Impacts of Sea Level Rise
Depsky, N., Bolliger, I., Allen, D., Choi, J. H., Delgado, M., Greenstone, M., Hamidi, A., Houser, T., Kopp, R. E., and Hsiang, S.: DSCIM-Coastal v1.0: An Open-Source Modeling Platform for Global Impacts of Sea Level Rise, EGUsphere [preprint], https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-2022-198, 2022.
This paper presents a modular open-source platform designed to estimate the global costs of sea level rise and easily ingest up-to-date socioeconomic and physical data, making it possible to transparently incorporate new insights. It is a core input to the Climate Impact Lab's Data-driven Spatial Climate Impact Model (DSCIM).

Published May 6, 2022

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Valuing the Global Mortality Consequences of Climate Change Accounting for Adaptation Costs and Benefits

Tamma Carleton, Amir Jina, Michael Delgado, Michael Greenstone, Trevor Houser, Solomon Hsiang, Andrew Hultgren, Robert E Kopp, Kelly E McCusker, Ishan Nath, James Rising, Ashwin Rode, Hee Kwon Seo, Arvid Viaene, Jiacan Yuan, Alice Tianbo Zhang, Valuing the Global Mortality Consequences of Climate Change Accounting for Adaptation Costs and Benefits, The Quarterly Journal of Economics, 2022;, qjac020, https://doi.org/10.1093/qje/qjac020

This paper estimates that the release of an additional ton of carbon dioxide today will cause mean damages to global mortality risk valued at $36.6 under a high emissions scenario and $17.1 under a moderate scenario, using a 2% discount rate that is justified by US Treasury rates over the last two decades. It is a core input to the Climate Impact Lab's Data-driven Spatial Climate Impact Model (DSCIM).

Published April 21, 2022

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ENSO impacts child undernutrition in the global tropics

Anttila-Hughes, J.K., Jina, A.S. & McCord, G.C. ENSO impacts child undernutrition in the global tropics. Nat Commun 12, 5785 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-021-26048-7

The El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a principal component of global climate variability known to influence a host of social and economic outcomes, but its systematic effects on human health remain poorly understood.

Published October 12, 2021

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Estimating a Social Cost of Carbon for Global Energy Consumption
Rode, A., Carleton, T., Delgado, M. et al. Estimating a social cost of carbon for global energy consumption. Nature 598, 308–314 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-021-03883-8
This study provides a globally comprehensive, detailed understanding of the impacts and behavioral adaptations caused by energy for cooling and heating, offering critical insights for policymakers, energy systems planners, business leaders, and a range of stakeholders who are preparing to mitigate and adapt to a more unstable climate. It is a core input to the Climate Impact Lab's Data-driven Spatial Climate Impact Model (DSCIM).

Published October 13, 2021

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Economic damages from Hurricane Sandy attributable to sea level rise caused by anthropogenic climate change

Strauss, B.H., Orton, P.M., Bittermann, K. et al. Economic damages from Hurricane Sandy attributable to sea level rise caused by anthropogenic climate change. Nat Commun 12, 2720 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-021-22838-1

Approximately $8.1 billion of Hurricane Sandy’s damages are attributable to climate-mediated anthropogenic sea level rise, as is extension of the flood area to affect 71,000 additional people.

Published May 19, 2021

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